Signs of High-Altitude Sickness, Treatment and Prevention

Here’s a list of the most common high altitude sicknesses, their treatment and prevention: Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS), High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE), High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE), Hypoxia, Hypothermia and Snow Blindness.

Being aware of high altitude sicknesses and expedition illnesses can mean the difference between life and death on the mountain.

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Wendy Ong Shares How She Overcame Her Spinal Cord Injury and Climbed On

This month, the star of the end of our September month is Wendy Ong, a Spinal Cord Injury survivor who has defeated the odds and continued to pursue her passions of climbing and skiing some of the most difficult passes.

“Certain that Bob had me, I unclipped from the anchors, leaned back – and then free-fell nearly 200 feet to the ground.” I kept telling myself, “Don’t close your eyes Wendy, don’t close your eyes.”

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Dealing With Post-Expedition Depression

Leading up to an expedition is a stressful time, and even during the expedition you’re faced with physical rigor and unimaginable requests of endurance from your body – but you wouldn’t have it any other way.

We often run into the same problem after the expedition when we’re home planning for the next trip or just “relaxing.” But we don’t really relax. All the downtime spent on the couch is spent recounting the days on the mountain, the snow, the good times, the ice, even the weather as annoying as it may have been at times. Once your boots are firmly on the ground, you find it hard to not have crampons on. You look around and don’t know how to manage the concept of walking into a grocery store and have no one know you just climbed Everest or K2 – no one around understands mountaineering life and most don’t even know mountaineering is a “thing.” How do you cope with this? How do you cope with wanting to be back on a mountain that terrifies and beats you down at every turn?

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