Dealing With Post-Expedition Depression

Leading up to an expedition is a stressful time, and even during the expedition you’re faced with physical rigor and unimaginable requests of endurance from your body – but you wouldn’t have it any other way.

We often run into the same problem after the expedition when we’re home planning for the next trip or just “relaxing.” But we don’t really relax. All the downtime spent on the couch is spent recounting the days on the mountain, the snow, the good times, the ice, even the weather as annoying as it may have been at times. Once your boots are firmly on the ground, you find it hard to not have crampons on. You look around and don’t know how to manage the concept of walking into a grocery store and have no one know you just climbed Everest or K2 – no one around understands mountaineering life and most don’t even know mountaineering is a “thing.” How do you cope with this? How do you cope with wanting to be back on a mountain that terrifies and beats you down at every turn?

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Editor’s Note: Relationships and Mountaineering: Why You Shun It but Shouldn’t

In this Editor’s Note, we’re going to be candid and frank, we’re talking about mountaineering/climbing and why many sportsmen in this field have issues making their romantic relationships work.

If your reason for being alone is because you don’t want to fight or constantly decide between love and climbing, then you don’t really want to be alone. You just don’t want to have to choose, which is different. 

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