Signs of High-Altitude Sickness, Treatment and Prevention

Here’s a list of the most common high altitude sicknesses, their treatment and prevention: Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS), High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE), High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE), Hypoxia, Hypothermia and Snow Blindness.

Being aware of high altitude sicknesses and expedition illnesses can mean the difference between life and death on the mountain.

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Tying an Auto-Locking Munter Hitch — Northeast Alpine Start

This article was shared from Northeast Alpine Start a mountaineering tip/tutorial and product review publication.

Continuing my almost weekly Tuesday (not always Tuesday) Tech Tip series this week I’m sharing how to build the Auto-Locking Munter (ALM) hitch. In last weeks post I shared how to tie a Munter Hitch (MH) directly onto a carabiner, a skill useful for any climber. This skill is a little more specialized and its…

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A Sore Neck, Wet Snow and a Taste of Camp 1 for Fredrik Sträng | K2 2017

Getting over a sore neck, traversing unnaturally wet snow and finally getting a taste of Camp 1, Fredrik Sträng’s K2 2017 Expedition has turned out to be eventful early on, but plans are still on track for the summit.

Since arriving at K2 Base Camp on 27, June, the expedition started off with minor delays, those usually attributed to life on K2. On 29, June, Fredrik and his climbing partner, Ali Musa, attempted to reach C-1 but snowfall and heavy winds forced them to abandon their plan, so, at Base Camp, they remained, but not idle. 

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Editor’s Note: Relationships and Mountaineering: Why You Shun It but Shouldn’t

In this Editor’s Note, we’re going to be candid and frank, we’re talking about mountaineering/climbing and why many sportsmen in this field have issues making their romantic relationships work.

If your reason for being alone is because you don’t want to fight or constantly decide between love and climbing, then you don’t really want to be alone. You just don’t want to have to choose, which is different. 

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Routes Up to K2’s Summit

First ascended by Achille Compagnoni on 31 July 1954, the mountain has since sprouted various routes across its faces that lead to the top.

Whether or not you’re crazy enough to attempt it, you’re not getting anywhere without a roadmap. Mountaineers usually take one of these ten pre-determined routes to the peak of K2.

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Could Climate Change Make Climbing More Dangerous?

Could climate change affect outdoor sports that rely heavily on safety, like climbing? One new study by Arnaud J.A.M. Temme published in a geographical journal, Geografiska Annaler, and based on research done by Wageningen University, says this could be the case.

More particularly based on climbing activities in the Alps, the author used previously published mountain guides to dissect the possibility of melting permafrost contributing to the loosening and falling of rocks on mountains.

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Short Definitions for High-Altitude Sicknesses

No one is born a mountaineering expert, not even those who are born to be mountaineers. Because of this, there are many enthusiasts who run into medical terms they either don’t understand or have never heard of altogether. Here’s a rundown of some common high-altitude sicknesses and what to do if you come across them. Consider this High-Altitude Sickness Lesson 101.

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